As digital marketers, #usDragons are always learning. We have to be. This field is constantly shifting and the rules are always changing.  And so we have to keep advancing our knowledge base.

The crowd watching the MHVDM presentation on Google AdWords

Photo Courtesy of The Kingston Library

Sharing that knowledge is part of our DNA. We lead social media workshops. We attend digital marketing conferences, at which many of them CEO Ric Dragon is a featured speaker.  Google Hangouts, Twitter chats, LinkedIn groups…we are everywhere gleaning and giving knowledge.  Why do we do it? Because we want to make the internet better for everyone. The more ‘best practices’ that are shared and implemented by companies, the more helpful/useful the internet becomes for end users (which, of course, we count ourselves among).

It was this commitment to sharing knowledge that led us to form the Mid-Hudson Valley Digital Marketers (MHVDM) group last year. Our mission was to bring together like-minded professionals several times a year so that our regional community could benefit from the exchange of ideas, information and strategies. And last week, we hosted another of these events, focusing on delivering a Google AdWords workshop. While the feedback indicates that attendees got a lot out of it, our team did too!

MHVDM Event Provided Learning Opportunities for All

The MHVDM event featured speakers Andy Groller, Director of Digital Advertising, and Paolo Vidali, Senior Digital Marketing Strategist, from our PPC team, giving a great top-level overview to help people get to know AdWords (you can view their slides from the presentation here).

But the buzz around our office the next day wasn’t about the presentation; it was about the questions fielded from the audience. It’s one thing to talk at a group of people, but it’s much better to talk with them.

The first question asked surprised everyone. “What’s a hashtag?”  It was a good reminder that we sometimes need to step out of our digital marketing bubble and realize that not everyone has the same level of knowledge that we do. We live and breathe this stuff since it is our business. The MHVDM workshop attendees live and breathe THEIR business. That’s why it is important that we share all that we can, and remember that all knowledge is valuable. So, in the end, not only did someone learn what a hashtag was, we all learned not to assume that everyone knows what a hashtag is!

The rest of the questions were just as helpful, such as “Can our competitors harm us by spamming our clicks?” (No, they can’t). “How does AdWords affect my organic traffic?” We even got questions via Twitter:

A question received via Twitter at the MHVDM event

Twitter users also offer some great takeaways overall.  I recommend checking #MHVDM for some great mini-recaps.
A MHVDM takeaway on choosing keywords

 

A takeaway on Google's algorithm from MHVDM

 

Over MHVDM takeaway from event

 

#usDragons also love any opportunity for people to share their knowledge with us. Guest speakers are always welcome in the DragonSearch office. Speakers like Kevin Mullett, Simon Heseltine, and Gemma Craven have talked with us about great topics. And MHVDM has provided us with a great experience to give back and share all sorts of knowledge as well. Some of our other events have included a panel discussion on social media marketing, and a seminar on online marketing for small businesses.

We want to extend a big thank you to everyone who has come out for these MHVDM events. It’s really wonderful to be able to engage with the community and feed off your enthusiasm for the subjects, whether it is Google AdWords or social media for small business. Check out the MHVDM Facebook group, Google+ community and follow us on Twitter to keep updated and join in on the conversations!

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This entry was posted on Friday, April 4, 2014 and is filed under Organizational Innovation, Social Media in Marketing.

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